Bladderbowel.gov.au

Department of Health and Ageing

Prolapsed bladder

Vaginal or pelvic organ prolapse is very common. It is thought that half of all women who have had a child have some level of pelvic organ prolapse, but only one in five seek help.

Prolapse occurs when the tissues which help join your pelvic organs to the bony side wall of the pelvis are torn or stretched and if your pelvic floor muscles are weak, then your pelvic organs, which includes your bladder, uterus, and rectum may bulge down into the vagina (birth canal).

There are a few different signs that you may have a prolapse. These signs depend on the type of prolapse and how much pelvic organ support has been lost. 

What can I do?

Prolapse can be treated and will not go away if your ignore it. If you are concern it is important that you contact your doctor or a continence advisor. For further information see:

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